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CLU®

Chartered Life Underwriter®

The landmark designation of The American College.

The CLU® is respected internationally as risk management’s highest standard of knowledge and trust. Since 1927, The American College has awarded this designation to professionals who obtain the advanced education to address the insurance needs of every client they serve.

Learn More: CLU® Curriculum
Life Insurance Awareness Month Logo

September is Life Insurance Awareness Month.

There’s a growing crisis of underinsurance—too many Americans without adequate life insurance.

This campaign offers you the perfect opportunity to talk to people in your community about their life insurance needs. Life Happens offers you a wide range of tools and resources to make that job easier, including messaging, videos, real life stories, and social-media posts and graphics.

LEARN MORE AND GET RESOURCES

CLU® Curriculum

HS 311: Fundamentals of Insurance Planning (Req.)

Focuses on the role of planning for insurance needs. Covers basic concepts in risk management and insurance, insurance industry operations, legal principles pertaining to this industry, and regulation of insurers. Examines social insurance, life insurance and annuities, medical and disability income insurance, long-term care insurance and personal property and liability insurance. Concludes with an overview of commercial property and liability insurance and a case study.

HS 323: Individual Life Insurance (Req.)

Focuses on life insurance policies and annuities available for the personal needs of individuals and their use in financial planning. Covers individual insurance products and insurance reserves regulation. Also covers insurance company organization, operations and investments.

HS 324: Life Insurance Law (Req.)

Examines legal rights and obligations of the policy owner and the insurance company, the way disputes between insureds and insurers are resolved and general principles of the judicial process. Covers legal aspects of life insurance, including basic principles of contract law; policy provisions and the incontestable clause; assignments, ownership rights and creditor rights; beneficiary designations and disposition of proceeds; the law of agency; and advertising and privacy issues.

HS 330: Fundamentals of Estate Planning (Req.)

Covers various aspects of estate and gift tax planning, including the nature, valuation, transfer, administration and taxation of property. Provides a basic understanding of the estate and gift tax system, including strategies of estate planning. Discusses gratuitous transfers of property outright or with trusts, wills and powers of appointment; use of the marital deduction; valuation of assets; and buy-sell agreements. Covers the client interview, fact finding, ethical standards and development of personal estate plans.

HS 331: Planning for Business Owners and Professionals (Req.)

Focuses on tax and legal aspects of organizing a business; compensation planning for the business owner; business succession planning; buy-sell agreements; estate planning and estate freezing techniques; methods for transferring a family business; lifetime disposition of a business interest

HS 300: Financial Planning: Process and Environment (Elec.)

Provides an overview of the financial planning process, including communication techniques, ethics, risk tolerance, time-value-of-money concepts, financial planning applications, regulatory issues and the legal and economic environment for financial planning. Offers an understanding of the role and responsibilities of a financial planner, along with some analytical skills to aid in financial decision making.

HS 313: Individual Health Insurance (Elec.)

Provides an overview of individual health insurance that is designed to meet the needs of individuals, families and certain business situations. Covers medical expense insurance, disability income insurance and long-term care insurance. Discusses types of policies, contractual provisions, regulation and underwriting. Consumer-directed health plans are also covered.

HS 321: Income Taxation (Elec.)

Examines the federal income tax system with particular reference to the taxation of individuals. Covers such concepts as gross income, exclusions from gross income, deductions, tax credits, capital gains and losses, taxation of life insurance and annuities and income taxation of partners, partnerships, corporations and shareholders.

HS 325: Group Benefits (Elec.)

Analyzes group insurance benefits including the governmental environment, contract provisions, marketing, underwriting, rate making, plan design, cost containment and alternative funding methods. Discusses the various private programs related to the economic problems of death, old age and disability, as well as government based health care under the Affordable Care Act. Covers cafeteria plans, as well as consumer directed health plans, such as HSAs and HRAs.

HS 326: Planning for Retirement Needs (Elec.)

Focuses on selecting the right retirement plan for the business and on individual retirement planning. Covers qualified plans, SEPs, SIMPLEs and 403(b) plans and nonqualified deferred compensation plans. Emphasizes the practical knowledge needed for choosing the best retirement plan, especially for the small business, and designing a plan that will meet a client’s needs. Also covers individual retirement planning including IRAs and Roth IRAs, Social Security benefits, saving for retirement and planning for retirement plan distributions.

HS 328: Investments (Elec.)

Covers various aspects of the principles of investments and their application to financial planning. Discusses risk analysis and risk and return computations. Looks at stocks, bonds, investment companies, options and futures contracts. Includes an extended discussion of tax issues in investing and issues in the practice of portfolio management, including strategic and tactical asset allocation. Provides many examples of ethical and practical issues in managing a client’s portfolio.

HS 334: Estate Planning Applications (Elec.)

Covers estate and gift tax principles with an emphasis on life insurance planning applications. Discusses forecasting the gross estate, life insurance trusts, valuation principles, the use of charitable contributions as an estate planning technique, planning opportunities stemming from the marital relationship, the taxation of trusts, implications of employee benefits and estate freezes. Includes a case study reflecting procedural aspects of estate planning.

HS 375: Introduction to Disability (Elec.)

This course introduces students to the field of disability and provides an orientation to working with individuals with disabilities and their families. It covers philosophical approaches, legislation, special education policies and procedure, disability etiquette, and how to work collaboratively with families. Students will learn the categories of disabilities such as emotional and behavioral challenges, sensory impairments, autism, and learning disabilities. Special attention is given to the planning requirements for transition of a child with disabilities into adulthood, when many educational programs and financial supports are no longer available. It also provides videotaped interviews with families in their home settings, providing powerful testimonies to the families’ determination to assist their children to become fully integrated into society and to reach their full potential.

HS 376: Legal and Financial Issues for Special Needs Families (Elec.)

This course covers unique legal techniques and tools that apply to special needs planning. Of particular importance are special needs trusts, wills, powers-of-attorney, and guardianships. The applicable issues surrounding Social Security and Medicaid are covered. In addition, special income tax topics enable financial advisors to understand and identify tax deductions and/or credits that may be available to families with special needs. It addresses some unique aspects of the medical expense deduction, the child and dependent care credit, the adoption credit, and the dependency exemption rules for families of individuals with special needs. The student will examine some potential alternative minimum tax traps that may affect many of these families. This course builds upon Introduction to Disability (HS 375) by providing the detailed legal and financial considerations crucial to the special needs environment.